They managed to get nearly two extra weeks of counting people as the case made its way through the courts. PRESS RELEASE | SEPTEMBER 29, 2020 Over 98% of Households Counted So Far in 2020 Census Over 98% of housing units have been accounted for … When the Census Bureau, and the Commerce Department, which oversees the statistical agency, picked an Oct. 5 end date, Koh struck that down too, accusing officials of “lurching from one hasty, unexplained plan to the next ... and undermining the credibility of the Census Bureau and the 2020 Census.”. Tags:  John H. Thompson, Government, politics, Census A briefcase of a census taker is seen as she knocks on the door of a residence Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020, in Winter Park, Fla… All rights reserved. But the Ninth U.S. October 14, 2020 October 13, 2020 The Associated Press ... Donald Trump’s administration had asked the nation’s high court to suspend a lower court’s order allowing the 2020 census to continue through the end of October. A federal judge in California ruled late Thursday night that national counting for the 2020 census can continue through October 31. The proposal to extend the apportionment deadline passed the Democratic-controlled House, but the Republican-controlled Senate didn’t take up the request. In a statement, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called the Supreme Court’s decision “regrettable and disappointing,” and said the administration's actions “threaten to politically and financially exclude many in America’s most vulnerable communities from our democracy.”, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor dissented from the high court's decision, saying “respondents will suffer substantial injury if the Bureau is permitted to sacrifice accuracy for expediency.”. “A census count delayed is justice denied," Liccardo said. Harris Is Hitting the Campaign Trail Again. The best breathable face masks for playing sports and... Our readers love this $5.45 tactical spork, Test your cloth, N95, or KN95 mask at home. The Supreme Court decision comes as a report by the the American Statistical Association has found that a shortened schedule, dropped quality control procedures, pending lawsuits and the outside politicization of some parts of the 2020 census have raised questions about the quality of the nation’s head count that need to be answered if the final numbers are going to be trusted. After a brief back-and-forth, with Trump mulling an executive order, the White House caved and left the question out. “A census count delayed is justice denied,” Liccardo said. The Supreme Court justices’ ruling came as the nation’s largest association of statisticians, and even the U.S. Census Bureau’s own census takers and partners, have been raising questions about the quality of the data being gathered — numbers that are used to determine how much federal funding and how many congressional seats are allotted to states. The Census Bureau says it has counted 99.9% of households nationwide, though some regions of the country such as parts of Mississippi and hurricane-battered Louisiana fall well below that. Then, in late July and early August, bureau officials shortened the count schedule by a month so that it would finish at the end of September. Terms under which this service The Trump administration argued that the head count needed to end immediately to give the bureau time to meet a year-end deadline. By sticking to the deadline, the Trump administration would end up controlling the numbers used for the apportionment, no matter who wins next month’s presidential election. The Census Bureau says it has counted 99.9% of households nationwide, though some regions of the country such as parts of Mississippi and hurricane-battered Louisiana fall well below that. A briefcase of a census taker is seen as she knocks on the door of a residence Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2020, in Winter Park, Fla. A half-million census takers … ‘Go big or go home:’ One SF restaurant spent $70K on its... As restaurants and bars struggle to survive a now seven-month-long pandemic, an investment of... Maps show where PG&E will turn off power in Bay Area tonight. Then, in late July and early August, bureau officials shortened the count schedule by a month so that it would finish at the end of September. The Trump administration requested to end the survey so that the data could be processed in time to meet a deadline concerning what the allocation of congressional seats would be for each state. In a brief unsigned order, the Supreme Court stayed the appeals court order. The Supreme Court ruling came in response to a lawsuit by a coalition of local governments and civil rights groups, arguing that minorities and others in hard-to-count communities would be missed if the census ended early. When the Census Bureau, and the Commerce Department, which oversees the statistical agency, picked an Oct. 5 end date, Koh struck that down too, accusing officials of “lurching from one hasty, unexplained plan to the next ... and undermining the credibility of the Census Bureau and the 2020 Census.”. In a statement, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called the Supreme Court’s decision “regrettable and disappointing,” and said the administration’s actions “threaten to politically and financially exclude many in America’s most vulnerable communities from our democracy.”, Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor dissented from the high court’s decision, saying “respondents will suffer substantial injury if the Bureau is permitted to sacrifice accuracy for expediency.”. The Trump administration argued that the head count needed to end immediately to give the bureau time to meet a year-end deadline. Congress requires the bureau to turn in by Dec. 31 the figures used to decide the states' congressional seats — a process known as apportionment. The apportionment deadline faced another wrinkle when in July, the Trump administration wanted to exclude illegal aliens. Last month, U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California sided with the plaintiffs and issued an injunction suspending a Sept. 30 deadline for finishing the 2020 census and a Dec. 31 deadline for submitting the apportionment numbers. Besides deciding how many congressional seats each state gets, the census helps determine how $1.5 trillion in federal funding is distributed each year. JUST IN: The Supreme Court has granted an emergency request from the Trump administration, allowing it to end the 2020 census count early. Over 99.9% of housing units have been accounted for in the 2020 Census. Here's Where She's Headed. With plans for the count hampered by the pandemic, the Census Bureau in April had proposed extending the deadline for finishing the count from the end of July to the end of October, and pushing the apportionment deadline from Dec. 31 to next April.